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tf 11022015 fnd img whale beneath kayak from staticflickrdotcomGreetings Aarti Shahani,

I listened to your segment on NPR this evening on tiny mobile living spaces. Somehow – don’t ask me how because I have no idea why my mind works the way it does – this reminded me of a series of thoughts I’ve had over the years relative to technology and travel.

Actually, not long ago, I wrote a blog entry about technology and how it could/should be recognized, used and leveraged as an infrastructure which could substantially help the environment, Animals, Planet, ourselves, and so on.

https://toniaynianightfish.wordpress.com/2015/10/18/technology-why-isnt-it-regarded-as-an-infrastructure/

But this writing, if you would bear with me please (I’ll keep it as short as I can), I’d like to share a different sort of thought; a specific technology that I think could do quite a lot of good.

I’m not sure what it should be called, to be honest. Perhaps E-Wall?   It would involve both a new type of hardware and new software (and hence perhaps some beneficial economy as well, hopefully).

The idea is to create a large panel, a bit larger than the typical, four foot tall “floor length” mirror. The panel would access the internet as a stand-alone device, with it’s own ISP and such. It would have perhaps four cameras (top, halfway-top, halfway-bottom, and bottom) and a very sophisticated software to disassemble and reassemble images to work with the panel to present a very full image.

With this panel or E-Wall, images with virtual meetings can take on a far fuller appearance. Right away this would reduce that need for and impact from “business travel.” It would also place the staff person virtually in the line of sight that some employers and customers seem to need.

Off work, there would also be a greater, richer experience for the home-viewer for all variety of live views.   If one wished, the E-Wall could, for example, show a view of the Sahara Desert or perhaps a Wild Animal preserve and so on in much fuller view and experience.  (Can you imagine waking up to see an Elephant on your panel/E-Wall?!  The trumpeting sound of such a magnificent creature could make for quite the alarm clock!)

The purpose of multiple cameras, aside of the virtual business meetings aspect, could revolutionize that “being there” experience with relatives or friends for holidays, vacations and so on.  About the only things missing with the E-Wall would be physical (some folks aren’t huggers anyway, so this could work out well) and sense of smell (which could be easily duplicated if one so wished).  Also, one would not need to pack or wrestle with that want to take all of one’s house along with themselves when traveling.

The E-Wall could also incidentally save lives with the lessening of traffic; air, road, or otherwise. Well, yes, travel reduction could be regarded as an economic disadvantage, but it need not if one leverages a bit of creative thinking.

Let’s say, an airlines company diversifies to accommodate E-Wall travelers, as it were. The airline company could buy the rights to several, enriched webcam experiences and charge modestly priced “tickets” for viewers to visit these places right from the comfort and (potentially greater) security of their homes.  Well, yes, the tourism industry would see some changes as well with this technology.  Again with some creative ingenuity, this industry could do also do well.

I see the technology of the E-Wall (or whatever name it might become to be called) as the next logical and correct step in the evolution of the webcam. I cannot help but wonder however why no one has yet come up with this concept? Or has this concept already come about and I missed it somewhere along the lines?

Could you please share, if you know?

Thanks so much for listening/reading. Bless your good heart and all your good work. I wish you and all yours well.

Blessings…

“Cap’n” Toni…

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One thought on “the E-Wall; letter to Aarti Shahani with NPR…

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